Search results

67 items
  1. Mérida: continued support for a failed strategy

    Liza ten Velde
    12 May 2012
    Article

    5 years ago Felipe Calderón declared a War on Drugs followed by a firm military crackdown on drug trafficking organizations. The US and Mexico agreed upon the Mérida Initiative; provision of US security assistance, mainly in the form of security equipment and law enforcement training for police and military.  What it has ‘accomplished’ is a severe deterioration of Mexico’s human rights climate related to abuses by army officials employed in domestic law enforcement tasks and to the specifics of military jurisdiction in Mexico.

  2. Has incoming Colombian President Santos inherited a "Captured State"?

    Coletta Youngers
    09 August 2010
    Article

    Juan Manual Santos has inherited what some Colombian analysts call a “captured state” and those forces remain at the center of his own base of political support. As a result, many assume that a Santos administration means continuity – more of the same but perhaps with a gentler face. However, there are other, incipient positive signs of change.

  3. Thumbnail

    Drugs and Human Rights: Related websites and documents

    Drugs and Democracy
    17 November 2005
    Article

    Links on drugs and human rights

  4. Conclusions: Democracias bajo fuego

    Drugs and Democracy
    13 May 1998
    Article

    The only lasting solution to the political and social instability and the corruption of governments and security forces, which are linked to drug trafficking, lies in gradual decriminalization of the market.

  5. Introduction: Democracias bajo fuego

    Martin Jelsma, Theo Roncken
    13 May 1998
    Article

    Drug policies, as currently implemented, with their highly repressive nature, cause more problems than they solve in Latin America.

  6. Radical Maneuvers

    Jayme Brener
    01 April 1997
    Article

    The increased willingness from Brazil and other countries to give a hand to the military efforts directed by the US, does not appear to be enough for Uncle Sam.

  7. The US & the War on Drugs: On the Wrong Path

    Coletta Youngers
    01 April 1997
    Article

    Despite Republican criticisms, the Clinton administration has largely continued the supply-side policies and strong-arm tactics laid out by its predecessors, Presidents Reagan and Bush.

  8. Argentina: Future Watchdog of the Americas?

    Adriana Rossi
    01 April 1997
    Article

    A surprising proposal presented to US President Bill Clinton by Argentine President Saul Menem during a visit in December 1996 to the White House seems to indicate a new role for the armed forces of this Latin American country.

  9. Colombia: The Heresy of the Manicheans

    Ricardo Vargas
    01 April 1997
    Article
    Alongside the emergence of a new social sector arising from the drug economy in Colombia, has been an increase in the use of violence against those State officials most committed to applying justice.
  10. Central America: On the Brink of a New War?

    Edgar Celada Q, Sandra Dávila
    01 April 1997
    Article

    The possibilities of a lasting peace in the region are placed in doubt by a new and silent war: one unleashed against drug trafficking, and in which the role of the region's armed forces remains unclear.

  11. Armed Forces and the Drug War: Between Garrisons, Caletas and Borders

    Ricardo Soberon
    01 April 1997
    Article

    On April 5, 1992, President Alberto Fujimori announced that the Armed Forces would take part in the war on drug trafficking, especially in the coca-producing valleys of the eastern strip of the Andes.

  12. Introduction: Damaging Side Effects - The War on Drugs

    Martin Jelsma
    01 April 1997
    Article

    The following essays present insights into the various levels of military involvement in the war on drugs and the implications of this involvement in terms of democracy and human rights in the Western hemisphere.

  13. Bolivia: Impunity and the Control of Corruption in the Fight Against Drugs

    Theo Roncken
    01 April 1997
    Article

    The narcotics police and the secret police have been implicated in cocaine trafficking in Bolivia since the late 1950s.

  14. Drugs and violence in the Northern Triangle

    Pien Metaal, Liza ten Velde
    08 July 2014
    Article

    The upsurge in violence in Central America’s Northern Triangle is often named in one breath with the drugs market. While violence clearly thrives from an illegal trade met with exclusively repressive state responses, assumptions on cause and effect are frequently flawed or blurred.

  15. The 2016 UNGASS: Challenges and Opportunities

    09 March 2015
    Article

    The UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs is fast approaching 2016 and is an important opportunity to conduct a thorough and objective assessment of the international drug control system. This session will discuss remaining challenges, as well as opportunities for the way forward – in particular towards rebalancing current drug policies towards the core UN values of public health, human rights and development

  16. Colombia, more than three decades of toxic sprayings. Enough!

    Amira Armenta
    26 September 2014
    Article

    It is unfortunate that 35 years after the first chemical spraying in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, we are still writing about aerial sprayings in Colombia, demanding the current government to definitely defer an ecocide and incompetent policy.

  17. Image of UN Flag

    A Russian Drug Czar for the world?

    Tom Blickman
    06 July 2010
    Article

    A top Russian diplomat, Yuri V. Fedotov, has emerged as the front-runner in the race to become the Executive Director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) – the world's new drug czar, according to Colum Lynch, a longtime Washington Post correspondent who reports on the United Nations for Turtle Bay.

  18. voice-of-russia

    Do we really want a Russian UN Drug Czar?

    Tom Blickman
    09 July 2010
    Article

    According to the Transform blog, it has been confirmed that the Russian diplomat Yuri V. Fedotov has been appointed as the new Executive Director of the UN Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC). What will be the implications? Russia has one of the worst records on drug policy and human rights: it ignores scientific evidence on effective HIV prevention among drug users and its punitive drug laws push drug users to the margins of society. Afghan opium poppy farmers could suffer from this appointment as well. The Russians hold them responsible for the 30,000 drug deaths in Russia every year.

  19. presidentemexico

    Todos Somos Juarez?

    Maureen Meyer
    19 October 2010
    Article

    On October 12, 2010, Mexican president Felipe Calderon traveled to Ciudad Juarez to attend a meeting evaluating the “Todos Somos Juarez” program which was announced seven months ago as a way to “rebuild” the violence-plagued city. Far from receiving praise during his visit, where Calderon inaugurated a mental health hospital and a public park as part of “Todos Somos Juarez,” the president was confronted with widespread protests from journalists and citizens. As one student commented, “Calderon is coming to open a psychiatric center when he is the creator of our psychosis. How does he dare to show his face?”  

Pages