Beyond the Market: The Future of Public Services

15 March 2007
Book

This yearbook proves that privatisation is not inevitable; that we can and must react to protect, preserve and reclaim our public service inheritance. It is clear that without extensive, universally distributed public services, there is no way the world can realise the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals.

This yearbook is not just a compilation of articles - however important and excellent they may be. It is also a call to arms. Many of its chapters prove that privatisation is not inevitable; that we can and must react to protect, preserve and reclaim our public service inheritance. It is clear that without extensive, universally distributed public services, there is no way the world can realise the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals.
- Susan George

Preface [PDF]
Susan George

Introduction [PDF]
Daniel Chavez

PART I: CONCEPTS AND ISSUES

  1. Rethinking Privatisation
    Towards a critical theoretical perspective
    [PDF]
    David A McDonald and Greg Ruiters
  2. Revisiting Good Governance
    Asserting citizens participation and politics in public services
    [PDF]
    Subodh Wagle and Kalpana Dixit
  3. Gender Perspective
    Privatisation: what does it mean for women?
    [PDF]
    Jane Stinson

PART II: SECTORAL TRENDS

  1. Health
    Wrong questions: wrong answers
    The global 'health reform' agenda
    [PDF]
    John Lister
  2. Education
    The legacy of recent reforms: privatisation and deprivation
    [PDF]
    Adriana Marrero and Francesc J. Hernández
  3. Electricity
    The global impacts of power reforms
    [PDF]
    Sharon Beder
  4. Water and Sanitation
    Democratic and innovative reforms in the Global South
    [PDF]
    Olivier Hoedeman and Satoko Kishimoto

PART III: NATIONAL REPORTS

  1. Bolivia
    The triumph of the national majorities and the challenge of change
    [PDF]
    J. Osvaldo Calle and María Lohman
  2. Brazil
    Between neo-liberalism and progressive reforms
    [PDF]
    Diego Azzi and Gonzalo Berrón
  3. Hungary
    Water privatisation in the context of transition
    [PDF]
    Zsolt Boda and Gábor Scheiring
  4. India
    Power politics at the mercy of vested interests
    [PDF]
    Prayas Energy Group
  5. Mexico
    The debate surrounding the ‘universalisation’ and ‘democratisation’ of public services
    [PDF]
    Diana Siller
  6. Morocco
    Between economic liberalisation and political stagnation
    [PDF]
    Elâabadila Chbihna Maaelaynine and Massimiliano Di Tota
  7. South Africa
    Public services: transformation or stasis
    [PDF]
    Greg Ruiters
  8. Lebanon and Syria
    Blackouts as a way of life
    [PDF]
    Alessandra Galié and Bernhard Hack
  9. United Kingdom
    Private choice versus accountability and equity
    [PDF]
    Catherine Needham
  10. United States
    Corporatisation: an internal clash of civilisations
    [PDF]
    Ben Manski and John E. Peck
  11. Uruguay
    Changes in a state-friendly society
    [PDF]
    Andrés Prieto

PART IV: SOCIAL AND CORPORATE ACTORS

  1. Corporate Actors
    A global review of multinational corporations in the water and electricity sectors
    [PDF]
    David Hall
  2. Social Actors
    Public resistance to privatisation in water and electricity
    [PDF]
    David Hall, Emanuele Lobina and Robin de la Motte

Contributors [PDF]