Withdrawal Issues

Report on the U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in Europe
31 March 2011
Report

Interviews conducted with European NATO delegations and NATO staffers concerned with nuclear planning and deployment reveal that there is sufficient political will to end the deployment of U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in Europe.

ISBN/ISSN
  • 978-90-70443-22-1

Are you wondering what NATO countries really say about the deployment of U.S. tactical (or sub-strategic or non-strategic) nuclear weapons? Many assumptions have been made, and repeated in countless reports by the media and experts over the last few years. However, Netherlands-based IKV Pax Christi set out to interview all 28 NATO delegations, as well as NATO staffers concerned with nuclear planning and deployment, to ask how they assessed the future of tactical nuclear weapons deployment in Europe. The result of these interviews is now available in the report: Withdrawal Issues: What NATO countries say about the future of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe.

The key findings of the report show that there is sufficient political will within NATO to end the deployment of U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in Europe. Fourteen, or half of all NATO member states actively support the end of TNW deployment while ten other countries say they would not block a consensus decision to removed the weapons. Only three NATO members (France, Hungary and Lithuania) say they oppose an end to the TNW deployment, and only France has is willing to invest political capital to keep the weapons on the territory of Belgium, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and Turkey.

Despite oft-repeated assumptions, there are no quick and easy formulae that accurately portray national positions. There is no clear relation between the duration of NATO membership and position on the TNW issue. The "new" NATO members are not more, or less, attached to the U.S. weapons than the "old" members. Likewise, proximity to Russia is no explanatory variable. Perhaps not so surprisingly, the more active countries are in nuclear sharing, the more vocal they are about wanting the weapons removed. The process of deciding the future of TNW deployment is currently at an impasse. The Strategic Concept dictates that NATO first needs to "aim to seek" Russian agreement on reciprocal steps towards a TNW free Europe. But Russia refuses to talk about its TNW until the U.S. first relocates all its TNW back to the U.S.. To break the impasse needs careful planning by multiple actors in multiple arenas.

Withdrawal Issues: What NATO countries say about the future of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe examines the reasons NATO countries give to end the deployment, examines the challenges they bring up and recommends a series of steps to overcome these challenges.

There are a number of things that NGOs can do with this report, including:

  • Send it to their national politicians and government officials asking them for a response to the content. 
  • Include a review or excerpt from the report in newsletters, or contact us for an article. 
  • Ask Parliamentarians to raise questions on key aspects of the report, including: 
    • What is the government doing to end the impasse with Russia? 
    • What is the government plan for the NATO Defence and Deterrence Posture Review? 
    • Who will be responsible in the Foreign Ministry for the Review? In the Defence Ministry? 
    • What will be the role, if any, of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly in the Review process? 
    • What will be the role of NATO's new arms control working group?

The full report, Withdrawal Issues: What NATO countries say about the future of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe is available at www.NoNukes.nl.

Pages: 32

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