King of the Sea: Seafood Sovereignty and the Blue Revolution

01 January 2013
Paper

Nine ways in which food sovereignty issues affect both the production and consumption of food from marine and freshwater aquatic food systems.

The paper discusses nine of the ways in which food sovereignty issues affect both the production and consumption of food from marine and freshwater aquatic food systems. Seafood sovereignty is threatened and challenged by the introduction of exotic species, inshore aquaculture, inshore harvesting by non-traditional technologies, allocation of access to offshore fisheries to foreign interests with non-traditional technologies, the tendency for foreign interests to deplete and depart, the creation of marine protected areas, the introduction of frankenfish and supersalmon, habitat destruction, and exploitation for exportation. In the face of these threats and challenges to seafood sovereignty, rights based approaches and activism and advocacy offer some countervailing pressures. The paper concludes with a discussion of likely future directions.

Craig K. Harris Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Michigan State University, with appointments in Michigan AbBio Research and the Center for Regional Food Systems Professor Harris is one of the co-founders of the Center for the Study of Standards In Society. He has studied the social dimensions of fisheries of the North American Great Lakes and the East African Great Lakes, especially Lake Victoria.

Food Sovereignty: a critical dialogue, 14 - 15 September, New Haven.